Rain Now and Then

Rain Now and Then

Poem and music by Anne Norman

Anne Norman: Shakuhachi

Outside My Window (Poem)

Written in 2011 at home in Victoria, Australia to accompany Rain Now and Then, at the end of a very long drought.

Anne Norman: spoken voice

Duration: 1:21

Rain Now and Then

Anne Norman: Shakuhachi

Duration: 5:28

Composer’s notes:

In February 2011, I experienced sheer delight at watching rain gently fall on my thirsty garden… sensations I had forgotten. The rain came and went throughout the day as I played my shakuhachi by the window, jotting down melodic ideas and colours until it was complete.

Recorded underground in the 172-meter-long Tunnel Number Five under Darwin (Australia), and released in the CD Beneath the Surface (2016)

All sounds and texts text © 2016 by Anne Norman

Dragon Dreaming

Dragon Dreaming

Anne Norman: Shakuhachi
Anja Tait: violin
David Matthews: field recording

Duration: 6:03

Artist’s notes:

On the northeast tip of Arnhem Land, where Macassans and Yolngu once traded, David recorded ocean swells surging in and out of air-filled caverns, pushing air through tiny nostrils in the bauxite. He called it “Breathing Planet” When amplified within the long tunnel, it sounds like a hung dragon asleep in its lair. Joining the dragon, Anne plays a traditional Zen meditation, Tamuke (Offering), accompanied by Anja’s violin. We respectfully acknowledge the Yolngu people for allowing David to explore that stretch of coast. This is our humble Offering in return.

Recorded underground in the 172-meter-long Tunnel Number Five under Darwin (Australia), and released in the CD Beneath the Surface (2016)

All sounds and texts text © 2016 by Anne Norman, Anja Tait, David Matthews

The Sea that Connects

The Sea that Connects ご縁

For fipple flute, bell, didgeridoo, chant, beatbox by Breath Trio

Some view the sea as that which separates, but for centuries ocean wind and currents have borne many to meet on distant shores.

 

海に隔てられた世界
潮と風は何世紀にも渡り
遥か遠くまで人々の出会いを届けた

 

 

Breath Trio are Anne Norman (shakuhachi), Sanshi (didgeridoo), Reo Matsumoto (beatbox (voice percussion)). Breath plays music rooted in the moment: Intuitive music-making that builds evocative soundscapes and then bursts into rhythms that makes you want to get up and dance. Combining the haunting and meditative sounds of shakuhachi with the mesmeric and pulsing drone of the didj and the playful soundscapes of Reo’s mouth and breath.

These three players bring an incredible combination of talent, sounds and colours:

Anne conjures melodies that sing through the shakuhachi, inspired by the time and place, and the sounds offered by her musical partners;

Sanshi plays didjeridoo with a power and creative flare that combines rhythms of Arnhem land with street tribal;

Reo simply astounds with what he is able to create with his mouth. There is a synthesizer and drum-kit hiding in there somewhere!

The Sea that Connects was released on the CD Ocean Breath in 2013.

For more information about Breath and their music, visit: Breath Trio’s Homepage

Music and text copyright © 2013 by Breath Trio

 

Ocean Breath

Ocean Breath オーシャンブレス
For Shakuhachi, Didgeridoo and Beatbox by Breath Trio

Vast white dune
Wide blue sky
Shifting sands
Ocean breath

 

広大な
白い砂丘と
広く青い空
青い空
砂なびかせる
大洋の息吹

 

 

Breath Trio are Anne Norman (shakuhachi), Sanshi (didgeridoo), Reo Matsumoto (beatbox (voice percussion)). Breath plays music rooted in the moment: Intuitive music-making that builds evocative soundscapes and then bursts into rhythms that makes you want to get up and dance. Combining the haunting and meditative sounds of shakuhachi with the mesmeric and pulsing drone of the didj and the playful soundscapes of Reo’s mouth and breath.

These three players bring an incredible combination of talent, sounds and colours:

Anne conjures melodies that sing through the shakuhachi, inspired by the time and place, and the sounds offered by her musical partners;

Sanshi plays didjeridoo with a power and creative flare that combines rhythms of Arnhem land with street tribal;

Reo simply astounds with what he is able to create with his mouth. There is a synthesizer and drum-kit hiding in there somewhere!

Ocean Breath is the title piece of their CD released in 2013.

For more information about Breath and their music, visit: Breath Trio’s Homepage

Music and text copyright © 2013 by Breath Trio

 

Perfect Harmony for David Dunn

Perfect Harmony for David Dunn
by Warren Burt

Duration: 15 minutes 34 seconds

Composer’s notes:

Last November 2014, for Soundbytes Magazine, I wrote a review of Bazille, a new software synthesizer from u-he productions in Berlin.

Soundbytes Magazine

Playing with this synthesizer, I noticed the many different ways you could control pitch on the machine.  All sorts of just-intonation and other microtonal things were not only possible, but easy.  And you could also combine different ways of controlling pitch for even more complex results. So I began to work on a piece that used some of the pitch possibilities of the synthesizer.  As I worked on it, I began to explore some of the upper reaches of the harmonic series, and was pleased with what I heard. I remember Harry Partch once said that “Just-Intonation dissonance is a whole other serving of tapioca.”  As dissonant as some of these sounds are, they do, from a just intonation point of view, constitute a “perfect” harmony.  Over the course of the piece, the harmonic world changes so at the end it is much more consonant than at the beginning. So there is a kind of harmonic tension and resolution in the piece, albeit a very extended one.  The piece was written for my friend David Dunn, a fellow explorer of extended realms of tuning for many years, as well as his own work in musical interactions with environmental phenomena.

Texts and sounds © 2015 by Warren Burt

A Song for Sky Bells by Le Tuan Hung

A Song for Sky Bells
by Le Tuan Hung

A new work for power pole bells, dan tranh (Vietnamese zither), Balinese suling (end-blown flute) and Oceanian panpipes

Duration: 9:56

bells2
A Song for Sky Bells is a composition for power pole bells, Vietnamese zither dan tranh , Balinese flute suling , and Oceanian panpipes. Power pole bells are unique Australian instruments. They are galvanised iron caps made by the State Electricity Company of Victoria to fit on the top of electricity poles made from tree trunks of varying diameters. Their function was to protect the poles from the weather and for mounting insulators above the poles. Since 1996, Australian composer Anne Norman has been collecting these bells for use as musical instruments and components of sound sculptures.

When I first touched these bells, I had the impression that their richness of frequencies and harmonics was the result of years of absorbing waves of vibrations from the winds and electric cables under the Australian sky. This impression is musically realised by the interaction of sounds of the bells, the dan tranh and the wind instruments. Frequencies and pitches are transmitted from one instrument to another in the process of generating melodies and layers of music. A Song for Sky Bells is music generated from the power pole bells after years of absorbing sounds in silence.

bells1
All sounds, images and texts copyright © 2004 by Le Tuan Hung

This project was supported by the Australian Government through the Australia Council, its arts funding and advisory body.

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Exhibition 18: Dear Safia… by Michal Glikson

Dear Safia…

A narrative soundscape with images by Michal Glikson

Dear Safia

Duration: 17:33

Safia

Safia, watercolour on paper

Budgie

Budgie, watercolour on paper

MGlikson_ Caravan of Ling_from Dear Safia, video,watercolour,paper_2013

Caravan of Ling, watercolour on paper

MGlikson_Elephantself_from Dear Safia_video, watercolour, paper_2013

Elephantself, watercolour on paper

MGlikson_Singing spider_from Dear Safia_video, watercolour, paper_2013

Singing Spider, watercolour on paper

Artist’s notes:

Dear Safia… comes out of my PhD project: Looking for taaluq: cross cultural experience examined through painting and sound

The work journals ideas about identity and alienation as they arose in context of my observations of Lake Burley Griffin, and living in Canberra in 2012. It reflects on these in the form of letters to Safia, a Pakistani woman I befriended in Lahore while working in Pakistan in 2011.

Making the work was a way of expressing my adjustment across cultures and coming to grips with life in Canberra, comparatively young, empty and naïve in comparison to the ancient megacity of Lahore. The Lake Burley Griffin became a place of solace around which I walked daily, sketching, recording its sounds, observing life along its shores and reflecting on the idea of it as “a toy that wants to be real”.

I found myself squinting at lake features, looking twice, through eyes coloured by ideas about colonial links between Australia, India and England. I researched its history to find myself thinking about early Canberra that was peopled by migrants. I recorded conversations with some of these, including my own family. I also learnt about particular pockets of the lake. I came to notice that the water had a “body” and “mind” with distinct moods and divergent cultures – ideas that I brought into writing for the script and narrative.

At the end of year I felt I had only touched the tip of this collection of worlds, the product of this time being two distinct works: a scroll painting about four meters long, and a seventeen minute sound track with narration. Integrated these became Dear Safia, a video subsequently completed in April 2013.

Of the many who assisted me I particularly wish to acknowledge the following people and organisations for their ongoing encouragement, contributions and support of my work:

Safia, Amanat, Imran, Nenah, and Sultan, who inspired.
Ruth Waller (Head of Painting Workshop, School of Art, The Australian National University, Peter Maloney; Supervisor, Laurraine and Mary, Miriam Simpson, The Lady of Trolley, Mariam of Civic, Mr Hungy, Princess Ling, artists of the Looperman website, Friends of Aranda Bushland, Le Tuan Hung, Daniele Dalia Viliunas, Damien Minton, Rodney Simpson, Rick Kuhn, Andrew Glikson, and the Lake Community in its rich entirety.

All sounds (except for materials by others listed in Sound Sources), images and texts  © 2013 by Michal Glikson

Sound sources:

Original sources:

Audio sources for the work includes Michal Glikson’s field recordings in Hunchy, Queensland, Canberra, ACT (Australia), Lahore (Pakistan), Delhi and Baroda (India).

Voices:
Narration: Michal Glikson
Dogs in faux wetlands Laurraine and Mary (Sirnames withheld as requested)
Safia and children Safiaben, Nenah, Imran
In the early days Miryam Simpson
Singing spider written and performed Michal Glikson
Home where is my written and performed by Michal Glikson

Audio materials from other sources:

Audio clips from royalty free online sound sites (www.looperman.com and http://www.friendsofarandabushland.org.au), and the recording of Maranoa Lullaby sung by Harold Blair from the National Film and Sound Archive (Permisson for use in this work has been granted by NFSA on 2/4/2012)

About the artist:

Michal Glikson is a visual and performance artist whose recent works focus on the living experience across the cultures of India, Pakistan and Australia. Since 2004, she has been creating illustrated scrolls incorporating histories and stories of people she met while travelling across India, Pakistan and Australia. An integrated part of her creative works involves writing narratives to accompany the scrolls and recording sounds on her journeys.

Her current research project focuses on the ancient storytelling tradition of Bengal Patuya Sangit – performance with scroll painting as a way of forming sound components in response to the illustrated mythology or parable. Her stories enfold panoply of beings – people, animals, plants, terrains encountered across cultures of Australia and the Indian subcontinent as a way of exploring ideas about empathy, and connections.
She completed a Masters in Visual Art at the Baroda School, Gujarat, India and studied Miniature Painting in Pakistan. She is currently a PhD Candidate at the School of Art, Australian National University (ANU)

Exhibition 17: Webs of Life by Dang Kim Hien

Webs of Life

(1996, revised 2012)

Music for an audio-visual realisation of the perception of life as presented in the painting Kiep Nguoi [Human Life] (1991) by Nguyen Van Doi.

Webs of Life by Nguyen Van Doi

Webs of Life by Nguyen Van Doi

Original music by Dang Kim Hien, except for fragments of melodies from Le Tuan Hung’s Scent of Time played on the shakuhachi [Japanese flute] by Anne Norman.

With Baby cries by Quoc Anh Tran (1996) and Buddhist chants by the monks of Quang Huong Gia Lam Temple (Vietnam)

Dang Kim Hien: dan tranh [zither], dan bau [monochord], dan nguyet [lute], trong com [rice drum], mo [woodblocks], phach tre [bamboo block], wooden clappers, rain stick, electronic crickets.
Le Tuan Hung: Ocarina, temple bell, wind chimes, rain stick, Helix wind roarer and field recordings.

Duration: 14:29

Composer’s notes:

Living as we do in this world, we are bound, or even trapped in many webs of life: webs of love and hate, webs of duties and ambitions, webs of ideals and desires. Is there a way out?

Kiếp Người (1996/2012)

Soạn cho một tác phẩm đa phương diện (nhiều âm thanh kết hợp với hình ảnh), sáng tác này chuyên chở ý niệm về cuộc sống được thể hiện qua bức tranh Kiếp Người của Nhạc sư Nguyễn Văn Đời: Suốt cuộc đời, ai ai trong chúng ta cũng vướng mắc vào những mạng lưới vô hình: Khi thì êm ái, nhẹ nhàng vướng vít như tơ tình, khi lại như những làn sóng điện mãnh liệt cuốn hút ta chạy theo tham vọng và lợi danh, hay là như những mắc xích kẽm gai nặng nề trói buộc ta vào trách nhiệm và bổn phận, lắm lúc lại như những dây độc rắn rít của thành kiến, ganh ghét và hận thù ăn sâu vào và hủy hoại tâm não ta. Những mạng lưới này âm thầm liên kết với nhau và bao trùm cả cuộc đời ta từ lúc sinh ra cho đến ngày xuôi tay nhắm mắt. Có mấy ai tìm được lối ra?

All sounds and texts  © 2012 by Dang Kim Hien

This work was released on the CD Melodia Nostalgica by Sonic Gallery in January 2013

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Exhibition 16: Lands Collide

Lands Collide

for Bb clarinet, bass clarinet, percussion and electronic

Music by Brigid Burke

Performed by Brigid Burke (Bb clarinet and electronics), Wendy Couch (Percussion), and Grania Burke (Bass clarinet)

Duration: 8:41

Composer’s notes:

Lands Collide incorporates texts, maps and traces of journeys. It represents Australian Aboriginal stories about the uses of water, and water in the environment.
Audio samples are used then “individually manipulated” using computer software.

All sounds and texts text © 2005 by Brigid Burke

Exhibition 15: A Book of Drones no. 7

A Book of Drones No. 7

Music created by Warren Burt

Duration: 8:23

A Book of Drones no. 7

Score: A Book of Drones no. 7

Composer’s notes:

This is an excerpt from the full length version of “Experience of Marfa: A Book of Drones No. 7.” It’s an excerpt of the score from 7:30 to 16:00. The piece uses a Balinese scale described in Colin McPhee’s “Music in Bali,” where it’s described as a “mutant Pelog.” Anything described as “mutant” is going to attract me, and the scale was indeed fairly unusual, with nicely dissonant relations between some of the 5 scale degrees. Marfa is a little town in west Texas, home of the mysterious atmospheric phenomenon known as the “Marfa Lights.” These are lights which appear dancing in the sky over the desert immediately east of Marfa about 2/3 of the nights of the year. The lights have been extensively documented, but so far resist explanation. On the night we were there, they failed to make an appearance, but my wife Catherine, who has seen them in the past, assures me that they do exist. The experience of Marfa, whether the lights appear or not, is one of peering intensely into a vacant, empty space, straining to detect patterns of activity, even where none may exist. Similarly with these drone pieces – a listening “into” the sound – hearing their inner patterns of activity may be as important as a listening “to” the sound – hearing the overall (very slow) progression of harmonies and colours. The piece was made in my home studio in Russell Vale in early December 2007, using a Roland keyboard and a Dell laptop running the LinPlug Octopus software synthesizer.

Warren Burt, 24 Dec. 2007

Sounds and text copyright © 2007 by Warren Burt